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Practical Resume Don'ts

I work for a small company. One of the "perks" of doing so is having to interview potential candidates. My resume is probably not the best but still I am amazed at some of the stuff I see regularly in people's resumes. Here's a small list:
  • Do not make more than 1 typo (really!)
  • Do not list any technology that's so old even the developer doesn't support it (so don't tell me you are an expert in Windows 3.0)
  • Please do not make your resume 7 pages (no you are not that smart and I am not interested in what you did 13 years ago)
  • Don't consistently misspell the name of a technology/product in which you are an expert!
  • If you are experienced, I have no interest in your college courses. Really, what does it matter that you took assembly language in college?
  • I don't expect you to tailor your resume perfectly to my company but at least tailor it to the position you are interviewing for. If you are interviewing to be a software developer, why would you think listing that you worked as a data entry clerk will impress anyone?
  • Similarly, if you want to be hired as a software developer, don't tell me you are an expert in "pearl". Just not cool.

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