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Things I've learnt in 3 months of fatherhood

  • It's very easy to take good health for granted. When your siblings (by birth and marriage) have a combined total of 7 healthy children it's very easy for you to forget all the health risks (to the mother and babies) associated with pregnancy. I like to say it's like buying a lottery ticket for a drawing that doesn't take place for 9 months!
  • We are so lucky that these babies have no health issues (fingers crossed). They were so tiny when they came out, being early twins and all. It's amazing that at their size (4lbs) everything was fully developed and working.
  • Nothing beats seeing your 3-month old daughter literally jump up for joy upon seeing you for the 101st time in the same day.
  • It's amazing how a 3-month boy can be so in tune with music. Play any sort of music and Toni will start dancing. Doesn't matter the song...just play it and he'll dance.
  • Perhaps all babies do these things and mine aren't special. But still, it's cool to watch them both do their thing
  • When you find out you're having twins, you know you are going to need 2 of everything. But it doesn't really come through until you have to do the minutia of daily living: when packing the diaper bag, you need twice as many diapers; you need twice as many feeding bottles; twice as many onesies; twice as many bouncers, swings etc. And I am not even talking about the cost of these things. For example, we've recently switched the babies to #2 nipples. Guess how many new nipples we had to buy? 20! Guess how many we have to throw out? 20!
  • Going out with twins is an experience. Twice we've gone out to restaurants and each time it was like we put on a show. We get treated with more attention and everyone (even the kitchen staff) wants to see the babies. In fact, this past Saturday we ate at P.F. Changs in Baltimore and our waitress (Dawn) was super super super nice. She gave us free appetizer on her own dime. Told us about her own twins (even introduced one of them to us). While we were eating, my wife mentioned that this was our anniversary dinner. And guess what? Dawn gave us free dessert (again on her own dime). Apart from the free food, her service was excellent (so if you are reading, Dawn's boss, she's super).

Comments

  1. having twins is blessing from GOD to choosen capable parents.Only the choosen ones have twins.What is the probability of having twins 1 : 100000
    What is the probabilty of having opposite sex twins at the same time 1: 1000000
    What is the probability of having idenical opposite sex twins , 1:10000000
    Goodluck and GOD BLESS, U , UR WIFE AND THE TWINS

    ReplyDelete

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