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Odds and Ends

I haven't really been paying much attention to politics. So I can't really write a full post about that. Except to say that I am really disappointed in the democrats and their leader, Obama. Apart from giving a bunch of banks free money with no strings attached; spending oodles of money on vague recovery projects in imaginary districts; pushing through a non-reformative Health Care Reform and giving sub-par gifts to visiting heads of state, what exactly has Obama accomplished in 12 months in the white house? What have the democrats done with their majority if they still had to kowtow to Lieberman on the so-called health care reform bill? Where's the reform if all you've done is force everyone to buy insurance (hooray for insurance companies) or pay fines? If people's health care choices are still tied so strongly to their employers? Where's the reform without any sort of public option? Anyway, enough about politics.

In technology, Google, in a move to kneecap their Android partners, will be releasing the new "google phone" (i.e. Nexus One) tomorrow. Seriously, does anyone still think Google isn't bent on global domination? First they created Android supposedly to address the iPhone monopoly (i.e. Apple creates the OS, the hardware and approves all apps for the phone). Then they got major players to buy into Android and commit to it (HTC, Motorola etc). Then comes act 3: get into the phone market yourself. How diabolical is that? How pissed Motorola must be that Google is releasing their phone (with the latest Android version no less) just a few months after Droid. I am sure all these manufacturers will be thrilled to compete with Google to create the best hardware for the operating system that Google owns (Android).

In sports, the Redskins completed another woeful season. Cerrato is gone; Zorn was fired this morning; and Shanahan is the next great big thing coming to fix the Redskins. Nevermind that Shanahan hasn't won a single playoff game without John Elway. Oh well, another big off season looms.

On the flip side, watching college football is fun. Especially during the bowl season (late December till early January). Where else do you get to see such varied offenses as the wishbone, the pistol, the spread, the triple-read-option (more on this below)? Certainly not the NFL where the coaches are afraid of original thought (for example: God forbid a coach call anything but a draw play on 3rd-and-long).

Talking about the triple-read-option offense...did you see any of Navy's game this year? I saw a couple of their games and came away very very impressed. Not only do they tire our your defense by running the triple option so well, they also frustrate your offense because you simply can't get on the field when Navy keeps running 15-18 play drives. They beat Notre Dame 23-21 with Navy's QB attempting just 3 passes! I watched them in the 2009 Texas Bowl (against Missouri) and they did the same thing: run them to death with the triple option. And every time the camera panned to the Missouri sidelines, you could just see the frustration on the faces of their coaches, players and fans.

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