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Like Frankenstein, the case of the curious charge from Enterprise is back alive....

A couple of months ago, I wrote about a curious charge of $40 from Enterprise (read the post for background). The gist of it is Enterprise Rental Car stuck me with a fee that they could not substantiate. They claimed I ran a toll while driving one of their cars and that they've:

  • decided to pay the fine for me
  • decided to charge me a 33% "admin fee" for that privilege
  • decided to wait several months before notifying 
  • decided to charge the fine + admin fee to my credit card.
So I did what anyone should: I called them to dispute it. Didn't get anywhere with them so I filed a dispute with American Express. After a couple of disputed charges, Amex ruled in my favor and I thought all was done. Well, guess what? It's not! Apparently, Enterprise really wants their money. So they've
  • decided to send me another notice (with no mention of our prior entanglement)
  • decided to change the fine from $30 to $25 (no reason given)
  • decided to call it a "parking fee" (that's what their customer service rep told me. When I told her that E-ZPass Maryland doesn't do parking, she didn't have a good explanation).
Anyway, I just called up Amex and explained the situation. They cancelled my card and another is in the e-mail. So now that Enterprise can't put unauthorized charges on my credit card, I would like to see what they do next. If it takes going to small claims court...well I have some vacation time saved up.

Yeah I know I've spent way more than $40 (in terms of time) on this case, but it's the principle (not principal) of the matter. 

BTW, someone from Enterprise apparently read my initial blog and got in contact with me. I have contacted him since I got the new letter and he's looking into the issue. So score 1 for their web "social network monitoring" group.

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