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Crime against humanity

So I just got a new job and along with that comes the task of setting up a new PC from scratch. First thing I did was install CCleaner and check out all the programs that have been set to run on start up (i.e. programs that run every time you start your computer) Since these programs are configured to run on start up, you would think they ought to be very critical components of your computer. So why is it that every self-important software company seem to think their programs belong in this category. For example, if Adobe Reader doesn't start every single time I boot my computer, is that really a big deal? So why the heck does Adobe think they need not 1, not 2 but 3 programs starting up every time I boot up? Why does Sun (Oracle) think I need to update Java (a program almost no one uses except for server applications)? Why does Apple think Quicktime needs to be started along with the computer? For one thing, the idea of having Quicktime is like appendix in humans i.e. absolutely useless!

I don't know how it is on Apple computers (am sure it's heavenly and magically) but I blame Microsoft. For making it so easy and open that every tom, dick and freaking harry can do whatever they want. If this were a MAC, every software that needs to run on startup would need a permission slip from Steve Jobs.

Comments

  1. Microsoft has whored themselves out to developers for the sake of making profits. Every Tom, Dick, Ola, and Patel that can scramble up a piece of cheap plastic can install a windows software in it...To add insult to injury these MANUFACTURERS will then try and compare their lame creations to Apple's MAGICAL devices. Apple wont allow useless programs to be installed without full knowledge of the end users.

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  2. Interestingly Apple makes one of the useless programs that cripples Windows PC. Hmmm, do you think maybe Quicktime is a trojan horse created by Apple to cripple Windows PC?

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