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The Playbook

So this one time I went to my boss to request raise. To prove I deserved a raise, I listed all the times I was late to work; the times I skipped out early; the times I deployed my code without testing it; I listed the times I took 2-hour lunches. Surprisingly, I didn't get the raise.

Obviously, that's not a true story. But there's a report that the "prosecutor" in the Tamir Rice case has released 2 external reports that justified the murder of the boy. Which, by my count, makes it the second case where a prosecutor intentionally sabotages his own case before the grand jury. This is from the playbook of how to tank your own case. I am not a lawyer but from the little I know, the prosecutor is supposed to be an advocate for the victim. If a prosecutor takes a case to the grand jury, that's because s/he believes the accused is guilty. So why would these experienced adopt this tactic that guarantees they won't get the result even a first year law student (or an ardent watcher of Law & Order) can get? Why would the DA in the Ferguson go so far out of his way to present exculpatory evidence for the defendant? Either he believes in the case and wants an indictment or he doesn't believe in the case and is trying to railroad an innocent man.

Unless, this is all part of the playbook. It's all part of the bullshit. It's part of the way the system is corrupted against minorities. Because these DAs can say "hey look, we tried to get an indictment but just couldn't". A 12-year old boy is shot dead 2 seconds after arriving on the scene by a cop that was fired from his previous cop job because he was "unfit" for police work. A seasoned prosecutor is about to tank the case right before our very eyes. And they want us to believe that black lives matter. That "all lives matter". If all lives matter; if black lives are equal to white lives; if black lives are equal to blue lives; how does this happen?

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/2ac4090767bf4bd58855ff296fcdf810/reports-officers-shooting-boy-pellet-gun-justified

Update: http://blog.tundey.net/2015/11/the-playbook-update.html

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